Archive | May 2014

Splish Splash! A Swimming Pool, At Last! (Part 2)

Well, I have to say that I am very impressed with the builders this time around…so far anyway!   Last week they got on with the pool at a rip-roaring pace.  They arrived early in the morning — our alarm call has been the cement mixer — and, after siesta,  worked well into the evening.  No complaints from us!

 

 

And then…they put in steps!  We were very excited about this!

 

We have steps!

We have steps!

Have you ever seen such magnificent steps?!

Have you ever seen such magnificent steps?!

 

And the grand finale to the week…Edge Tiles!

 

Edge Tiles!

Edge Tiles!

 

Fabulous job, don’t you think?

As I type, the menfolk are busy laying the ocean blue tiles inside the pool.  They have promised that it will be finished by the end of this week.  We will see.  The plumbing hasn’t been finished yet…

But like I said, we can’t complain.  They’ve done a great job, so far.  And, the weather hasn’t been great this week.  It needs to be a little warmer up here in the mountains before I will take a dip!

 

 

 

©Natalie Murray, 2014. Copying strictly prohibited. Extracts and links may be used only with full and clear credit given to Natalie Murray/English in Andalucia with appropriate links to the source material.

Splish Splash! A Swimming Pool, At Last! (Part 1)

When I was doing overtime in Abu Dhabi, I would regularly remind myself that it would all be worth it in the end.  All those extra hours in the classroom, which were, of course, always a delight, would allow us to treat ourselves later on.  That time has now come!

Last week, the builders arrived to start work on our pool!  It isn’t going to be the biggest pool in the world.  You wouldn’t be able to train for the next Olympics in it.  But…it’s all ours!

We were very excited the day the digger arrived…

 

Towards the end of the day the digger managed to get a puncture!  We thought all was lost.  But, our valiant Spanish builders soldiered on with the help of a pneumatic drill!

 

digger tyre c                                                         digger tyre 2 c

 

We didn’t want to get our hopes up that work would continue the next day.  Mañana is a long time coming in Andalucia.  But, back they came; the puncture was fixed, the hole completed, and the steel mesh laid.

 

mesh c

 

On Friday, a large lorry arrived with a delivery of concrete, which was poured into the hole.  It was then levelled out and left to dry over the weekend.  We were tasked with wetting it down occasionally with the hosepipe, apparently to reduce the possibility of cracks.  I’m told, by the man of the house, that there will always be some cracks.

 

concrete c

 

And, as the sun went down on the day…

 

sunset c

 

We wondered whether our workers would return on Monday morning…

The dogs did too!

 

Jack n Jilly c

 

 

 

 

©Natalie Murray, 2014. Copying strictly prohibited. Extracts and links may be used only with full and clear credit given to Natalie Murray/English in Andalucia with appropriate links to the source material.

 

What do you know about widows and orphans?

If you are in the publishing industry, there is probably a lot you can tell me about widows and orphans!  If you are not, then you are forgiven for being mistaken about the widows and orphans to which I am referring!

I am now a good way through the proofreading course which I started a few months back.  I am still thoroughly enjoying it, but, instead of getting easier the more knowledge I gain, it’s getting harder!  There is more and more to remember; new symbols, new terms, some of whose descriptions appear to me to be in another language at times.  I get frustrated with myself, frequently, when checking the answers to exercises, and realizing that I haven’t spotted, what would appear to be, an obvious error!  But then I remind myself that the exercises are part of the training, and that I should learn from them…and not repeat my errors.  If it was easy, it wouldn’t be worth doing, would it?

Neck pain is proving to be a side effect, too.  I am sitting properly, at a desk, on an office chair, and I’m aware that I should be conscious of my posture.  However, constantly looking down at the course texts results in neck pain.  Is it my age or is it just that it’s a different posture for me?  Hopefully, it’s the latter and my neck muscles will adjust.  Otherwise, it will be hell when I launch my freelance proofreading business and I’m inundated with work.  Which, of course, I will be!

Hmmm…after a while, my eyes go a bit squinty, too!

Image

As I said, I am really enjoying the course and I’m much more knowledgeable on the subject now than I was six months ago.  I know I still have a lot to learn, and that I will continue to learn on the job, but that’s the way it should be.  We should never stop learning.

What have you learnt today?  There must be something!  Leave a comment and let me know.

 

 

©Natalie Murray, 2014. Copying strictly prohibited. Extracts and links may be used only with full and clear credit given to Natalie Murray/English in Andalucia with appropriate links to the source material.

 

Thinking of ADOS/DOS/Senior Teacher roles?

Ready for an EFL managerial role? Why not test the waters at a summer school.

Simple English ~ Nicola Prentis

If you’re a teacher with a DELTA or equivalent, Summer School in the UK is an opportunity to try out a Senior or Managerial role. Positions in year round schools for those jobs come up as often as students produce Future Perfect Continuous sentences so experience in a similar role might be what sets you apart and gets you a shot at it one day. The summer version might be shorter, but it’s like a double espresso shot compared with caffe latte – way more intense.

There’s a shortage of qualified people in summer. Often the most suited have a decent enough job that they want their summers off – or choose to work in universities in EAP. But to climb the ladder it might be worth one summer seeing what you’re capable of.

image

But, please, only if you can satisfy the following:

You’re computer literate

Computer literate managers are…

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